Voisin 4

From Wings of Linen
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Voisin 4
Role Ground Attack
Manufacturer Voisin
Introduction April 1915 [1]
Primary users Roundel of the French Air Force before 1945.svg France
Imperial Russian Aviation Roundel.svg Russia
Number built 200 [2]
Developed from Voisin 3
Engine 120hp Salmson M9 radial
Armament 37mm Hotchkiss cannon
Crew 2
Max Speed 90 km/h (56 mph)[3][note 1]
Climb 2,000 m (6,560 ft) in 35:00[3][note 2]
Ceiling 3,500 m (11,500 ft)[4]
Endurance 3:09 [3] or 4:00 [4]

The Voisin 4 was a Voisin 3 adapted to carry a 37mm cannon by lengthening the fuselage and shifting the wings backward. The gunner was moved to the front seat to operate the cannon. By their arrival at the front in April 1915, they were already to slow to be a fighter, but they found new life as ground-attack aircraft and they served with one unit all the way through May 1917. It was also known as the Voisin LB (or LBS when the engine was mounted on an elevated platform). [5] A small number of them were built in Russia by Dux.[6]

Timeline [note 3]

Timeline error. Could not store output files

Game Data

Wings of Glory

Preliminary Stats
Availability Maneuver Damage Dmg Points Max Alt. Climb
Apr15-Feb17 XC C 11 9 8

Miniatures and Models

1:144 Scale

1:285/6mm/1:288 Scale

Resources

Orthographic Drawings

References

Notes
  1. 105 km/h (65 mph) with 160hp Salmson.[4]
  2. 1,000 m (3,280 ft) in 10:00, 2,000 m (6,560 ft) in 22:00, 3,000 m (9,840 ft) in 40:00 with 160hp Salmson.[4]
  3. Plane counts are approximate and based of escadrille usage in Davilla'97.
Citations
  1. Davilla, p.544.
  2. Angelucci, p.73.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 Davilla, p.551.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 Durkota, p.358.
  5. Davilla, p.550.
  6. Durkota, p.352.
Bibliography
  • Enzo Angelucci, ed. The Rand McNally Encyclopedia of Military Aircraft, 1914-1980. New York: The Military Press, 1983 edition. ISBN 0-517-41021-4.
  • Dr. James J. Davilla and Arthur M. Soltan. French Aircraft of the First World War. Flying Machines Press, 1997. ISBN 0-9637110-4-0.
  • Alan Durkota, Thomas Darcey, and Victor Kulikov. The Imperial Russian Air Service. Flying Machines Press, 1995. ISBN 0-9637110-2-4