Vickers Vimy

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Vickers Vimy
Vickers Vimy.jpg
Role Bomber
Manufacturer Vickers
First flight Nov 1917 [1]
Introduction Oct[1] to Nov[2] 1918
Primary user RAF Type A Roundel.svg U.K. (RFC/RAF)
Number built 221[2]
Wingspan 20.5 m (67 ft 2 in)[3] - 20.7 m (68 ft)[4]
Propeller Diam. 3.20 m (10 ft 6 in)[4]
Engine 2×360hp Rolls-Royce Eagle VIII [note 1]
Armament 2-4 flexible Lewis MGs [note 2], 1,100 kg (2,476 lb)[3] to 2,200 kg (4,804 lb)[4] of bombs
Ammo 4 spare drums front; 6 spare drums rear
Max Speed see table
Climb see table
Ceiling see table
Range 1,400 km (900 mi)[6][3]

The Vickers F.B.27 Vimy was the answer to the Air Board's request for a twin-engine heavy bomber. A series of prototypes with various engines began flying in November 1917, and some of them looked good, carrying a payload close to or exceeding the Handley-Page O/400. Large orders were placed, but continued refinement and experimentation delayed the first plane arriving in France until October 1918, arriving too late to see combat.

Three of them were on charge at the end of the war: two with experimental units and one with the Independent Force at Nancy, but none of them were used on operational missions. Vickers had only finished thirteen of them by the end of 1918.[5]

It achieved a new form of fame after the war in long-distance flying. The Vimy was the first plane to fly non-stop across the Atlantic and also the first to fly from Britain to Australia.

ConditionSpeed (ground level)ClimbSvc. CeilingAbs. Ceiling
No bombs 166 km/h (103 mph)[6][3] 6,500 ft (2,000 m) in 14:00[7]
10,000 ft (3,000 m) in 25:55[7]
14,000 ft (4,300 m)[7]
Loaded 5,000 ft (1,500 m) in 21:55[7]
6,500 ft (2,000 m) in 33:00[7]
7,000 ft (2,100 m)[6][7] 10,500 ft (3,200 m)[3][7]
All stats with 360hp Rolls-Royce Eagle engines.

For more information, see Wikipedia:Vickers Vimy.

Game Data

Wings of Glory

Unofficial Stats
Availability Maneuver Damage Dmg Points Max Alt. Climb
18Q4 K A/A 19 6 7

Miniatures and Models

1:144 Scale

1:300 Scale

References

Notes
  1. Several other engines were experimented with, but Eagles were most common.[5]
  2. Typically 2 flexible front, 1 flexible dorsal and 1 flexible ventral in the rear.[4]
Citations
  1. 1.0 1.1 Bruce'69, p.697.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Angelucci, p.80.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 Angelucci, p.72.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 Bruce'65, p.10.
  5. 5.0 5.1 Bruce'65, p.7.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 Munson, p.75.
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 Bruce'65, p.12.
Bibliography
  • Enzo Angelucci, ed. The Rand McNally Encyclopedia of Military Aircraft, 1914-1980. New York: The Military Press, 1983 edition. ISBN 0-517-41021-4.
  • J.M. Bruce. British Aeroplanes 1914-18. Great Britain, Funk & Wagnalls, 1957, 1969. ISBN 0370000382
  • J.M. Bruce, Profile Publications 5: The Vickers F.B.27 Vimy. Great Britain: Profile Publications, Ltd., 1965.
  • Kenneth Munson, Bombers: Patrol and Reconnaissance Aircraft, 1914-1919. New York: The MacMillan Company, 1968, Blandford Press Ltd. ISBN 978-0753721711