SPAD 13

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SPAD 13
SPAD S.XIII Front.jpg
Role Fighter
Manufacturer S.P.A.D.
Designer Louis Béchereau
First flight Apr 1917
Introduction May 1917
Primary users Roundel of the French Air Force before 1945.svg France
US Army Air Roundel.svg U.S.A.
ItalianRoundelGreen.png Italy
RAF Type A Roundel.svg U.K. (RFC/RAF)
Roundel of Belgium.svg Belgium
Number built 8472[1]
Wingspan 8.20 m (26 ft 11 in) [2]
Engine 200 or 220hp Hispano-Suiza 8B inline
Armament 2×sync. Vickers[note 1]
Crew 1
Max Speed 211 km/h (131 mph)[3][2] [note 2]
Climb 1,000 m (3,280 ft) in 2:20[3]
2,000 m (6,560 ft) in 5:17[3][2]
3,000 m (9,840 ft) in 8:45[3][2][note 3]
Service Ceiling 6,650 m (21,800 ft)[4]
Ceiling 6,800 m (22,300 ft)[3][2]
Endurance 2:00 [3][4][2][note 4]

It was originally hoped that the twin-gunned SPAD 13 (aka "SPAD XIII C.1") would replace the SPAD 7 in mid 1917, but troubles with the geared Hispano-Suiza engine slowed production output and only 131 had been delivered by December 1917.[1] All of the early models had rounded wing tips, but by spring of 1918 the wing tips were squared off for better maneuverability.

Production eventually picked up, and total SPAD 13 production numbers are over 8,400 aircraft. It was used by France, equipping 90 fighter escadrilles and 30-40 army cooperation escadrilles. It was used by roughly 20 Italian Squadriglias, Sq.23 RFC, and most American fighter squadrons. By the end of the war, most French and American fighter units were fully equipped with the SPAD 13.

For more information, see Wikipedia:SPAD S.XIII.

Timeline[edit]

Game Data[edit]

Wings of Glory[edit]

Official Stats
Maneuver Damage Dmg Points Max Alt. Climb
Maneuver.png Firing.png Damage.png Ceiling.png Climb.png
A A 16 15 2

Plane and Crew Cards[edit]

Card Links[edit]

Blue Max/Canvas Eagles[edit]

Aircraft Chart

Miniatures and Models[edit]

1:144 Scale[edit]

1:285/6mm/1:288 Scale[edit]

1:300 Scale[edit]

Resources[edit]

Orthographic Drawings[edit]

References[edit]

Notes
  1. American planes were armed with twin Marlin machine guns increasingly through 1918.
  2. Speed 218 km/h (135 mph) with the 220hp engine.[3]
  3. Climb 2,000 m (6,560 ft) in 4:40 with the 220hp engine.[3]
  4. Endurance 1:40 with the 220hp engine.[3]
Citations
  1. 1.0 1.1 Davilla, p.501
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 Lamberton, pp.216-217.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 3.8 Davilla, p.509.
  4. 4.0 4.1 Munson, p.47.
Bibliography
  • Dr. James J. Davilla and Arthur M. Soltan. French Aircraft of the First World War. Flying Machines Press, 1997. ISBN 0-9637110-4-0.
  • W.M.Lamberton and E.F. Cheesman. Fighter Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War. Harleyford Publications Limited, 1960.
  • Kenneth Munson, Fighters 1914-19, Attack and Training Aircraft. New York: MacMillan Publishing Co., Inc., 1976. ISBN 0713707607