S.A.M.L. S.2

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S.A.M.L. S.2
Airplanes - Types - Airplane Type. S.A.M.L. motor, Fiat 300 H.P., Type 1917. Italian Aviation Mission - NARA - 17342301.jpg
Role Reconnaissance
Manufacturer S.A.M.L.
Designer Robert Wild
Introduction Feb 1917 [1]
Primary user ItalianRoundelGreen.png Italy
Number built 657 [note 1]
Developed from S.A.M.L. S.1
Wingspan 12.1 m (39 ft 8 in)[3] - 12.5 m (41 ft)[4]
Engine 200hp Fiat A-12 inline
Armament top-wing forward Revelli MG and
flexible rear Revelli MG
40 kg (88 lb)[3] of bombs
Crew 2
Max Speed 162 km/h (101 mph) [5][6][3] - 167 km/h (104 mph)[7]
Climb 1,000 m (3,280 ft) in 5:40[5][7]
2,000 m (6,560 ft) in 12:00[5]-12:06[7]
3,000 m (9,840 ft) in 22:00-21:37[7]
4,000 m (13,100 ft) in 30:45[7]-37:00[5]
Ceiling 5,000 m (16,400 ft) [6][3]
Endurance 3:30 [6][7][3]

The SAML S.2 was a development of the S.A.M.L. S.1, which was derived from the Aviatik Type P15. The wings were reduced in span and a bay was removed, which decreased drag at the expense of reduced climbing capability. Cameras were added as well as an overwing front-firing Revelli machine gun.

The S.2 filled an important gap between the Savoia-Pomilio pushers and the later Italian two-seaters such as the Pomilio PD/PE and Ansaldo SVA's. The lifetime of the S.2 was extended by the S.I.A. 7b debacle, but after better two-seaters became available the SAML planes were moved to training duty. [1]

One unusual feature of the S.2 was uneven-span wings. The right wing was 5cm wider than the left, probably in an attempt to balance propeller torque.

For more information, see Wikipedia:Aviatik B.I.

Timeline [note 2]

Game Data

Wings of Glory

Unofficial Stats
Version Availability Maneuver Damage Dmg Points Max Alt. Climb Points
two gun 17Q1-18Q4 K B/B 16 10 4 87
rear gun only K -/B 16 10 4 59

Plane and Crew Cards

Miniatures and Models

1:144 Scale

1:285/6mm/1:288 Scale

Resources

Orthographic Drawings

References

Notes
  1. Combined SAML S.1 and S.2 total, most of which were S.2's.[2]
  2. Timeline data is approximate, gathered from various sources.[8]
Citations
  1. 1.0 1.1 Alegi, p.4.
  2. Alegi, p.2.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 Angelucci, p.84.
  4. Lamberton, p.170.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 Alegi, p.32.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 Munson, p.51.
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5 Lamberton, pp.226-227.
  8. Alegi'05, p.5.
Bibliography
  • Gregory Alegi, Windsock Datafile 113: The SAML S.2. Great Britain: Albatros Publications, Ltd., 2005. ISBN 1-902207-75-0
  • Enzo Angelucci, ed. The Rand McNally Encyclopedia of Military Aircraft, 1914-1980. New York: The Military Press, 1983 edition. ISBN 0-517-41021-4.
  • W.M. Lamberton and E.F. Cheesman, Reconnaissance & Bomber Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War. Great Britain: Harleyford Publications Ltd., 1962. ISBN 9780900435027
  • Kenneth Munson, Bombers: Patrol and Reconnaissance Aircraft, 1914-1919. New York: The MacMillan Company, 1968, Blandford Press Ltd. ISBN 978-0753721711