R.A.F. F.E.2b

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R.A.F. F.E.2b
Royal Aircraft Factory FE2b profile.jpg
Role Fighter/General Purpose
Manufacturer R.A.F.
Designer Geoffrey de Havilland
First flight March 1915 [1]
Introduction 20 May 1915 [1]
Primary user RAF Type A Roundel.svg U.K. (RFC/RAF)
Number built 1,939 [1]
Developed from R.A.F. F.E.2a
Variants FE.2c, FE.2d
Wingspan 14.6 m (47 ft 9 in) [2][3]
Engine 120hp Beardmore inline or
(later)160hp Beardmore inline
Armament front flexible Lewis [note 1]
160 kg (350 lb) of bombs[note 2][2]
Crew 2
Max Speed see chart
Climb see chart
Service Ceiling see chart
Endurance see chart

The R.A.F. F.E.2b was one of the great aeroplanes of World War I, taking on a variety of roles from 1915 through the Armistice. While the R.A.F. F.E.2a had struggled due to the low power of its Green engine, a better match was found in the 120hp Beardmore, and the F.E. with that engine was designated the F.E.2b. The wings were also redesigned for this model rather than using the same wings as the R.A.F. B.E.2c. Though the first arrived in France in May 1915, by September No.6 Squadron still only had four on hand, and only thirty-two had been delivered by the end of 1915. Production increased in 1916.

On many planes a second Lewis gun was mounted on a telescoping pole between the cockpits to allow the observer to stand and shoot over the top wing, thereby covering a pusher's greatest blind spot.

In addition to reconnaissance and fighter roles, the F.E.2b was used as a night fighter, a light bomber, anti-submarine patrol, and a home-defense plane. It was the ultimate workhorse and proved useful long beyond its peak days in 1916. [1]

EngineSpeedClimbCeilingEndurance
120hp Beardmore inline 129 km/h (80 mph)[4][5][3] 910 m (3,000 ft) in 9:50[4][6][3]
1,800 m (6,000 ft) in 22:45[4][6][3]
3,000 m (10,000 ft) in 51:45[4][6]
2,700 m (9,000 ft)[4][5][3] 2:30[5] to 3:00[4]
160hp Beardmore inline 146 km/h (91 mph)[4][6][3] 910 m (3,000 ft) in 7:24[4][6][3]
1,800 m (6,000 ft) in 16:38[4][6][3]
3,000 m (10,000 ft) in 39:44 [4][6][3]
3,400 m (11,000 ft) [4][6][3] 2:30[5] to 3:00[4]

For more information, see Wikipedia:Royal Aircraft Factory F.E.2.

Game Data[edit]

Wings of Glory[edit]

Unofficial Stats
Availability Maneuver Damage Dmg Points Max Alt. Climb
Maneuver.png Firing.png Damage.png Ceiling.png Climb.png
16Q1-18Q4 G B 14 8 6
Card Links[edit]

Blue Max/Canvas Eagles[edit]

Aircraft Chart

Miniatures and Models[edit]

1:144 Scale[edit]

1:200 Scale[edit]

1:285/6mm/1:288 Scale[edit]

1:300 Scale[edit]

1:350 Scale[edit]

References[edit]

Notes
  1. Frequently supplemented by another Lewis firing backward over the top wing.
  2. 73 kg (160 lb) with 120hp engine
Citations
  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Bruce'69, p.390.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Lamberton'62, pp.214-215.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 3.8 3.9 Lamberton'60, pp.214-215.
  4. 4.00 4.01 4.02 4.03 4.04 4.05 4.06 4.07 4.08 4.09 4.10 4.11 Bruce'69, p.399.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 Munson, p.20.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 6.6 6.7 Bruce'89, p.29.
Bibliography
  • J.M. Bruce. British Aeroplanes 1914-18. Great Britain, Funk & Wagnalls, 1957, 1969. ISBN 0370000382
  • J.M. Bruce, Windsock Datafile 18: RAF FE2b. Great Britain: Albatros Publications, Ltd., 1989. ISBN 0-948414-22-7
  • W.M.Lamberton and E.F. Cheesman. Fighter Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War. Harleyford Publications Limited, 1960.
  • W.M. Lamberton and E.F. Cheesman, Reconnaissance & Bomber Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War. Great Britain: Harleyford Publications Ltd., 1962.
  • Kenneth Munson, Fighters 1914-19, Attack and Training Aircraft. New York: MacMillan Publishing Co., Inc., 1976. ISBN 0713707607