Phönix D.I

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Phönix D.I
Phönix D.I 228.45.jpg
Role Fighter
Manufacturer Phönix
Designer Kirste [1]
First flight Spring 1917 [2]
Introduction Dec 1917 [2] to Feb 1918[3][4]
Primary user Cross-Pattee-Heraldry.svg Austria-Hungary
Number built [note 1]
Wingspan 9.5 m (31 ft 2 in)[5] - 9.88 m (32 ft 5 in)[6]
Engine 200hp Hiero inline
Armament 2×fixed sync. Schwarzlose [note 2]
Ammo 2×300 rounds[7][4]
Crew 1
Max Speed 178 km/h (111 mph)[8][9] - 180 km/h (112 mph)[10] - 182 km/h (113 mph) [6][5]
Climb 1,000 m (3,280 ft) in 3:00[10]-3:05[8][9][6]
2,000 m (6,560 ft) in 7:00[10][8][9][6]
3,000 m (9,840 ft) in 12:00[10][6]-12:15[8][9]
Ceiling 6,000 m (19,700 ft)[5][10]
Endurance 2:00[5] - 3:00[6]

Orders for the Phönix D.I arrived in March 1917, but it wasn't until October that the first batch was accepted, and the planes trickled in all the way through May of 1918. There were three series built, Series 128, 228, and 328, differentiated mainly by the manufacturer of the 200hp Hiero engine. The machine guns were mounted well-forward and unfortunately out of reach in case of a jam. Flight reports said it was faster than an Albatros D.III(Oef) and better in flight than the Aviatik D.I. Reaching the front in Winter/Spring 1917-18, it flew with at least eleven Fliks. [2]

Forty D.I series 128 were sent to the K.u.K Naval Air Service to defend Trieste and Pola in 1918, where they were renumbered J.1-40 and brightly repainted, usually fighting Italian flying boats and bombers.[4] Reportedly they were fast and climbed better than a Camel, but they were a little too stable.[11]

For more information, see Wikipedia:Phönix D.I.

Timeline

Game Data

Wings of Glory

Official Stats
Availability Maneuver Damage Dmg Points Max Alt. Climb Points
winter17/18-end X A 15 13 3 84

Plane and Crew Cards

Blue Max/Canvas Eagles

Aircraft Chart

Miniatures and Models

1:144 Scale

1:200 Scale

1:285/6mm/1:288 Scale

Resources

Orthographic Drawings

References

Notes
  1. Unknown, but perhaps 50 were built of all Phönix fighter types.[3]
  2. Guns are inaccessible in flight.
Citations
  1. Haddow'67, pp.3-4.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Grosz'93, p.118.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Angelucci, p.60.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 Haddow'67, p.5.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 Angelucci, p.50.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 Lamberton, pp.212-213.
  7. Kelly, p.231.
  8. 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 Grosz'93, p.119.
  9. 9.0 9.1 9.2 9.3 Grosz'92, p.35.
  10. 10.0 10.1 10.2 10.3 10.4 Haddow'67, p.12.
  11. Haddow'67, p.6.
Bibliography
  • Enzo Angelucci, ed. The Rand McNally Encyclopedia of Military Aircraft, 1914-1980. New York: The Military Press, 1983 edition. ISBN 0-517-41021-4.
  • Peter M. Grosz, George Haddow, and Peter Schiemer. Austro-Hungarian Army Aircraft of World War One. Flying Machines Press, 1993. ISBN 0-9637110-0-8.
  • P.M. Grosz, Windsock Datafile 31: Phönix D.I~II. Great Britain: Albatros Publications, Ltd., 1992. ISBN 0-948414-37-5
  • George Haddow, Profile Publications 175: The Phönix Scouts. Great Britain: Profile Publications Ltd., 1967.
  • Kevin Kelly, "Belts and Drums: A Survey of First World War Aircraft Ammunition Totals". Over the Front, Vol. 5, No. 3, Autumn 1990. Walsworth Publishing Co, Inc. and The League of World War I Aviation Historians.
  • W.M. Lamberton and E.F. Cheesman, Fighter Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War. Great Britain: Harleyford Publications Limited, 1960.