Pfalz D.III

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Pfalz D.III
Zd3.jpg
Role Fighter
Manufacturer Pfalz
Designer Rudolf Gehringer [1][2]
First flight late spring 1917 [3]
Introduction Aug 1917 [3][2][note 1]
Primary users Cross-Pattee-alternate3.svg Germany
Roundel otto.JPG Ottoman Empire
Number built 260 [5]
Variants Pfalz D.IIIa
Wingspan 9.4 m (30 ft 10 in) [6][7][8]
Engine 160hp Mercedes D.III inline
Armament 2×sync. fixed LMG08/15 [note 2]
Ammo 1000 rounds[8]
Crew 1
Max Speed 165 km/h (103 mph)[9][10][7][8][note 3] to 169 km/h (105 mph)[6]
Climb 1,000 m (3,280 ft) in 3:15[9][8]
2,000 m (6,560 ft) in 7:15[9][8]
3,000 m (9,840 ft) in 11:45[9][8]-17:00[6]
Ceiling 5,200 m (17,000 ft)[9][10][7]
Endurance 2:00[8]-2:30 [9][8][10][7]

Pfalz had gained enough experience building the L.F.G. Roland D.II to put together a fighter design of their own, and the result was the well-streamlined Pfalz D.III. The ply-wrapped oval fuselage was very strong. While the lower wing was smaller in chord than the upper, its twin spars kept it from suffering the twisting problems of the Nieuport and Albatros sesquiplane designs, and the Pfalz had a reputation of being stable and strong in a fast dive.[11]

Early D.IIIs had the machine guns buried in the fuselage, but later ones, in the form of the Pfalz D.IIIa, moved them to the upper decking where they could be serviced in case of a jam.[12] By early 1918, with the D.IIIa coming into full play, the D.III had started to be moved into more of a training role or supplied to ally Turkey.[3]

The D.III was a good aeroplane, but it was overshadowed by the Albatros D.Va and Fokker D.VII[2], and prejudice against Bavarian Pfalz decreased its stature with front-line pilots. It was used with success by pilots such as Werner Voss (before switching to the Fokker Dr.I) and Paul Baümer.[13]

For more information, see Wikipedia:Pfalz D.III.

Timeline [note 4]

Game Data

Wings of Glory

Official Stats
Availability Maneuver Damage Dmg Points Max Alt. Climb Points
Jun/Jul17-Jul18 J A 16 12 3 83

Plane and Crew Cards

Card Links

Blue Max/Canvas Eagles

Aircraft Chart

Miniatures and Models

1:144 Scale

1:200 Scale

1:285/6mm/1:288 Scale

1:300 Scale

Resources

Orthographic Drawings

References

Notes
  1. It was first accepted into service in June 1917.[4]
  2. Guns are inaccessible in flight.
  3. 165 km/h (103 mph) at 3,000 m (10,000 ft), likely faster at ground level.[8]
  4. German numbers are from bi-monthly Frontbestand records (Effective Frontline Strength).[14]
Citations
  1. Grosz'90, p.2.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Angelucci, p.59.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 Rimell, p.1.
  4. Gray'65, p.7.
  5. Grosz'90, p.33.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 Lamberton, pp.220-221.
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 Angelucci, p.48.
  8. 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 8.8 Gray'65, p.12.
  9. 9.0 9.1 9.2 9.3 9.4 9.5 Gray'87, p.190.
  10. 10.0 10.1 10.2 Munson, p.35.
  11. Gray'65, p.8.
  12. Gray'87, p.187.
  13. Gray'65, p.10.
  14. Grosz'85, p.60 and Grosz'86, p.66.
Bibliography
  • Enzo Angelucci, ed. The Rand McNally Encyclopedia of Military Aircraft, 1914-1980. New York: The Military Press, 1983 edition. ISBN 0-517-41021-4.
  • Peter Gray and Owen Thetford. German Aircraft of the First World War. Great Britain, Putnam, 1962, 1987. ISBN 0-85177-809-7.
  • Peter L. Gray, Profile Publications 43: The Pfalz D.III. Great Britain: Profile Publications Ltd, 1965.
  • Peter M. Grosz, "Archiv -- Frontbestand". WW1 Aero, № 107, Dec 1985 and № 108, Feb 1986. Poughkeepsie, NY: World War I Aeroplanes, Inc.
  • P.M. Grosz and R.L. Rimmel, ed., Windsock Datafile 21: Pfalz D.IIIa. Great Britain: Albatros Productions, Ltd, 1990. ISBN 0-948414-25-1
  • W.M. Lamberton and E.F. Cheesman, Fighter Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War. Great Britain: Harleyford Publications Limited, 1960.
  • Kenneth Munson, Fighters 1914-19, Attack and Training Aircraft. New York: MacMillan Publishing Co., Inc., 1976. ISBN 0713707607
  • R.L. Rimell and P.M. Grosz, Windsock Datafile 7: Pfalz D.III. Great Britain: Albatros Publications, Ltd., 1988. ISBN 0-948414-11-1