Nieuport 28

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Nieuport 28
Nieuport28.jpg
Role Fighter
Manufacturer Nieuport
First flight June 1917 [1]
Primary user US Army Air Roundel.svg U.S.A.
Number built 297 [1]
Wingspan 8.15 m (26 ft 9 in) [2]
Engine 160hp Gnome Monosoupape 9Nc rotary
Armament 2×sync. fixed Vickers
Crew 1
Max Speed 198 km/h (123 mph) [3][4] to
206 km/h (128 mph)[5][2]
Climb 1,500 m (5,000 ft) in 4:30[5]
2,000 m (6,560 ft) in 5:30 [3][2]
3,000 m (10,000 ft) in 9:00[2]-11:30[5]
Ceiling 5,180 m (17,000 ft) [3][4][5]
to 6,100 m (20,000 ft)[2]
Range 400 km (250 mi)[3]
Endurance 1:30 [3][4][5]

By mid to late 1917, the vee-strutted sesquiplane Nieuport design had seen its zenith come and go. The Nieuport 28 was an attempt to return to dominance with a more conventional biplane design. For the first time a Nieuport airplane was fitted with twin forward-firing machine guns: one Vickers on the top deck and another deep on the port side. In a rare design decision, ailerons were fitted only to the bottom wings. It had good maneuverability but it had a tendency to shed fabric in a high-speed dive, and it was not selected for French service.

The Americans needed a fighter, though, especially with the SPAD 13 allocations aimed for French service, and they purchased 297 of the Nieuport 28. In service it was not popular and its lifetime was only about four months long before being replaced by the SPAD 13. Nevertheless, many American pilots earned their first victories flying the Nieuport 28. They were used by the 27th, 94th, 95th, and 147th Aero Squadrons.

For more information, see Wikipedia:Nieuport 28.

Timeline[edit]

Game Data[edit]

Wings of Glory[edit]

Official Stats
Maneuver Damage Dmg Points Max Alt. Climb
Maneuver.png Firing.png Damage.png Ceiling.png Climb.png
F A 14 13 2
Card Links[edit]

Blue Max/Canvas Eagles[edit]

Aircraft Chart

Miniatures and Models[edit]

1:144 Scale[edit]

1:200 Scale[edit]

1:285/6mm/1:288 Scale[edit]

1:300 Scale[edit]

1:350 Scale[edit]

Resources[edit]

Orthographic Drawings[edit]

References[edit]

Citations
  1. 1.0 1.1 Davilla, p.405.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 Lamberton, pp.216-217.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 Davilla, p.408.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 Munson, p.63.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 Guttman, p.35.
Bibliography
  • Dr. James J. Davilla and Arthur M. Soltan. French Aircraft of the First World War. Flying Machines Press, 1997. ISBN 0-9637110-4-0.
  • Jon Guttman, Windsock Datafile 36: Nieuport 28. Great Britain: Albatros Publications, Ltd., 1992. ISBN 0-948414-44-8
  • W.M. Lamberton and E.F. Cheesman, Fighter Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War. Great Britain: Harleyford Publications Limited, 1960.
  • Kenneth Munson, Fighters 1914-19, Attack and Training Aircraft. New York: MacMillan Publishing Co., Inc., 1976. ISBN 0713707607