Nieuport 17

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Nieuport 17
Nieuport 17 fighter 1A1182101XXXVII017 (15204900430).jpg
Role Fighter
Manufacturer Nieuport
First flight Jan 1916
Introduction March 1916[1]
Primary users Roundel of the French Air Force before 1945.svg France
Imperial Russian Aviation Roundel.svg Russia
RAF Type A Roundel.svg U.K. (RFC/RAF)
RAF Type A Roundel.svg U.K. (RNAS)
ItalianRoundelGreen.png Italy
Roundel of Belgium.svg Belgium
Variants Nieuport 17bis, 21, 23
Wingspan 8.18 m (26 ft 10 in) [2]
Engine 110hp Le Rhône 9J/9Ja rotary
Armament sync. Vickers and/or top-wing Lewis
Crew 1
Max Speed 165 km/h (103 mph) [3][4][5]
to 172 km/h (107 mph)[2]
to 177 km/h (110 mph)[6]
Climb 1,000 m (3,280 ft) in 3:00[2]
2,000 m (6,560 ft) in 5:30[2]-6:50[3][5]
3,000 m (9,840 ft) in 9:00[2]-11:30[3][5]
4,000 m (13,100 ft) in 18:05[3]-19:30[2][note 1]
Ceiling 5,300 m (17,400 ft) [3][4][6][5][2]
Range 250 km (160 mi) [3]
Endurance 1:45 [3][5]
to 2:00 [4][6][2]

When the Nieuport 11 was refitted with a 110hp engine it was redesignated the Nieuport 16. The Nieuport 16 was nose-heavy and somewhat clumsy, so the type saw a redesign with larger wings and other changes, now christened the Nieuport 17.C 1, also known as the 15-metre Nieuport. It was one of the top fighters of 1916-1917. Its armament varied from a top-wing Lewis gun, a synchronized Vickers, or both, though the performance suffered when both were carried. All RFC Nieuport 17's were refitted with a single Lewis gun on a Foster pivoting mount.

The Nieuport 17 had to be flown somewhat gingerly due to the tendency of the lower wings to twist, a property shared not only with other Nieuports but with the German Albatros D.III and D.V. Variants included the Nieuport 17bis, with a fully faired fuselage and Clerget engine; the Nieuport 21, with the engine and fuselage of the Nieuport 11; and the Nieuport 23, with a different synchronizer.

Several thousand Nieuport 17s were built, and they were used by every French fighter escadrille from mid-1916 through mid-1917, when they were replaced by SPAD 7s or Nieuport 24/27s. They were purchased or built by Belgium, Italy (where the last of them were still in service in June 1918), Romania, Russia, and Britain, for both the RFC and RNAS. Many also flew during the Russian Civil War.

For more information, see Wikipedia:Nieuport 17.

Timeline [note 2][edit]

Game Data[edit]

Wings of Glory[edit]

Official Stats
Maneuver Damage Dmg Points Max Alt. Climb
Maneuver.png Firing.png Damage.png Ceiling.png Climb.png
I A or B 12 12 3

Plane and Crew Cards[edit]

Card Links[edit]

Blue Max/Canvas Eagles[edit]

Aircraft Chart

Miniatures and Models[edit]

1:144 Scale[edit]

1:285/6mm/1:288 Scale[edit]

1:300 Scale[edit]

1:350 Scale[edit]

Resources[edit]

Orthographic Drawings[edit]

References[edit]

Notes
  1. Russian-built N17s: 1,000 m (3,280 ft) in 3:12, 2,000 m (6,560 ft) in 6:48, 3,000 m (9,840 ft) in 11:30, 4,000 m (13,100 ft) in 19:30.[4]
  2. Timeline data is approximate, gathered from various sources.[7] [8] [1]
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 Updated card
Citations
  1. 1.0 1.1 Lamberton, p.94.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 Lamberton, pp.216-217.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 Davilla, p.385.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 Durkota, p.358.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 Bruce'99, p.33.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 Munson, p.61.
  7. Davilla, p. 379.
  8. Durkota, p. 353.
Bibliography
  • J.M. Bruce, Windsock Datafile 20: Nieuport 17. Great Britain: Albatros Publications, Ltd., 1999. ISBN 0-948414-24-3
  • Dr. James J. Davilla and Arthur M. Soltan. French Aircraft of the First World War. Flying Machines Press, 1997. ISBN 0-9637110-4-0.
  • Alan Durkota, Thomas Darcey, and Victor Kulikov. The Imperial Russian Air Service. Flying Machines Press, 1995. ISBN 0-9637110-2-4
  • W.M.Lamberton and E.F. Cheesman. Fighter Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War. Harleyford Publications Limited, 1960.
  • Kenneth Munson, Fighters 1914-19, Attack and Training Aircraft. New York: MacMillan Publishing Co., Inc., 1976. ISBN 0713707607