Nieuport

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Société Anonyme des Éstablishments Nieuport was opened in 1909 by Édouard de Nieport[note 1] in Darracq, France. Édouard died in a crash in 1911 and the company leadership fell to his brother Charles, who subsequently died in a crash in 1913. Chief engineering responsibilities fell to Gustav Delage, who designed many of the famous Nieuport aircraft of WWI.[1]

Aircraft from the Great War or shortly thereafter include:

References

Notes
  1. It is not known why the spelling of the founder and the company are different
  2. The Type 13 was a prototype 2-seat biplane that was not selected for production.[2]
  3. The Type 15 was a 1916 prototype two-seat bomber. At least two were built but it did not enter production.[3]
  4. The Type 18 was a prototype three-seater with a 150hp Hispano-Suiza engine.[4]
  5. The Type 19 was another multi-engine bomber prototype.[5]
  6. The Type 22 has not been identified.[6]
  7. The Type 25 was basically a Nieuport 24 with a 200hp Clerget 11E. One was used by Charles Nungesser but it never entered French production, though it may or may not have been used in Russia.[7]
  8. The Type 26 has not been identified.[6]
  9. The Type 29 was an advanced fighter that took until 1920 to enter service, where it remained until 1929.[8]
  10. The Type 30 was a two-seat bomber with a 450hp Renault engine. Too late for the war, a handful were built and used as early airliners.[9]
  11. The Types 80-83 were trainers built in the Nieuport 10 or 12 designs, with the 80hp Le Rhône engine.[10]
Citations
  1. Davilla'97, p.349.
  2. Davilla'97, p.374.
  3. Davilla'97, p.376.
  4. Ferry'14, p.65.
  5. Davilla'97, p.386.
  6. 6.0 6.1 Davilla'97, p.390.
  7. Davilla'97, p.399.
  8. Davilla'97, pp.412-415.
  9. Davilla'97, p.416.
  10. Davilla'97, pp.416-418.
Bibliography
  • Dr. James J. Davilla and Arthur M. Soltan. French Aircraft of the First World War. Flying Machines Press, 1997. ISBN 0-9637110-4-0.
  • Vital Ferry. French Aviation During the First World War. Paris: Histoire and Collections, 2014. ISBN 978-2-35250-370-5