Morane-Saulnier

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Leon Morane and Raymond Saulnier formed Société Anonyme des Aéroplanes Morane-Saulnier in 1910 in Villacoublay, Paris. The firm went on to produce many models, including several pre-war planes that saw combat. Morane-Saulnier designs were very influential and influenced the design of planes for both Entente and Central Powers combatants.[1] Unlike most manufacturers, Morane-Saulnier used alphabetic lettering for their designs rather than numeric.

Aircraft from the Great War or shortly thereafter include:

References

Notes
  1. The 1911 Type A was a pre-war monoplane with a 50hp Gnome.[2]
  2. The 1911 Type C referred to five Type As re-engined with the 80hp Gnome for Russia.[2]
  3. The 1911 Type F had an 80hp Gnome. Two were built for Romania.[2]
  4. The 1912 Type GA was a Type G with a 60hp Le Rhône.[2]
  5. The 1912 Type GA was a Type G with a 80hp Le Gnome.[2]
  6. The Type O was a racing airplane from 1914. At least two were built.[3]
  7. The Type PP was a pre-war plane named for its Paris to Pau flight.[2]
  8. The Type S was a prototype three-seat twin-engined heavy bomber.[2]
  9. The TRK was a triplane bomber prototype from 1915.[4]
  10. The Type U was a Type V with ailerons. It did not see production.[5]
  11. The Type X was a 1916 bomber project that may have only existed on paper.[6]
  12. The Type Y was a three-seat reconnaissance prototype.[2]
  13. The Type AE was a two-seat reconnaissance prototype with the 150hp Le Rhône engine.[7]
  14. The AF was a single-seat biplane prototype, aka MoS28, with the unreliable 150hp Gnome engine.[8]
  15. The AFH was a prototype version of the AH intended for carrier use.[9]
  16. The AN series were two-seat fighter prototypes of 1918 with various engines.[10]
  17. The BH was a prototype based on the BB with a 140hp Hispano-Suiza engine, a first for Morane-Saulnier.[11]
  18. The 1913 Type BI was a two-seat monoplane with the 80hp Gnome.[2]
  19. The WR refers to both a Type G seaplane built for Russia and a two-seat armored airplane.[2]
Citations
  1. Davilla, p.309
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 2.8 2.9 Davilla'97, p.309.
  3. Davilla'97, p.323.
  4. Davilla'97, p.329.
  5. Davilla'97, p.331.
  6. Davilla'97, p.332.
  7. Davilla'97, p.334.
  8. Ferry'14, p.151.
  9. Davilla'97, p.337.
  10. Davilla'97, p.341.
  11. Davilla'97, p.348.
Bibliography
  • Dr. James J. Davilla and Arthur M. Soltan. French Aircraft of the First World War. Flying Machines Press, 1997. ISBN 0-9637110-4-0.
  • Vital Ferry. French Aviation During the First World War. Paris: Histoire and Collections, 2014. ISBN 978-2-35250-370-5
  • W.M. Lamberton and E.F. Cheesman, Reconnaissance & Bomber Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War. Great Britain: Harleyford Publications Ltd., 1962. ISBN 9780900435027