Martinsyde G.102

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Martinsyde G.102
Role Long Recon./Bomber/Fighter
Manufacturer Martinsyde
Designer A.A. Fletcher[1]
Introduction 1916
Primary user RAF Type A Roundel.svg U.K. (RFC/RAF)
Number built 170[note 1]
Developed from Martinsyde G.100
Wingspan 11.6 m (38 ft) [3][2]
Propeller Diam. 2.90 m (9 ft 6.2 in)[4]
Engine 160hp Beardmore inline
Armament top-wing fixed Lewis
(sometimes) one rear/left-firing Lewis
100–150 kg (230–336 lb)[2] of bombs
Ammo 2-3 drums of 47-97 rounds[5]
Crew 1
Max Speed 153 km/h (95 mph)[6]
to 167 km/h (104 mph)[7][3][8]
to 174 km/h (108 mph)[4]
Climb 910 m (3,000 ft) in 3:30[7][3][8]
1,800 m (6,000 ft) in 8:05[7][3][8]
2,000 m (6,500 ft) in 9:00[4]
3,000 m (10,000 ft) in 15:30[4]-15:55[7][3][8]
4,600 m (15,000 ft) in 34:00[4]
Service Ceiling 4,300 m (14,000 ft)[6]
to 4,900 m (16,000 ft) [7][3][8][4]
Endurance 4:30 [7][4] to 5:30[6][3][8]

The upgrading of the Martinsyde G.100's engine from 120hp to 160hp gave it greater lifting power, and that played well into its naturally-discovered niche as a single-seat light bomber. Thus the Martinsyde G.102 doubled its bomb capacity to either two 112lbs or one 230lb bomb. In addition to France, the G.102 was used in Palestine and Mesopotamia, where they were still active in 1918.

Deliveries probably started in the last quarter of 1916, but 160hp Beardmores probably saw more demand for the widely-used R.A.F. F.E.2, so it was not until the year 1917 that G.102s became more common. No.67 Squadron did not receiver theirs until October 1917.[9]

Both the G.100 and G.102 earned the nickname Elephant for their large size (for a single-seater). [10]

For more information, see Wikipedia:Martinsyde G.100.

Game Data

Wings of Glory

Preliminary Stats
Availability Maneuver Damage Dmg Points Max Alt. Climb
16Q4-17Q4[note 2] Y B 14 11 4

Blue Max/Canvas Eagles

Aircraft Chart

Miniatures and Models

1:144 Scale

1:285/6mm/1:288 Scale

Resources

Orthographic Drawings

References

Notes
  1. Some of the G.102 orders were built with the 120hp Beardmore, so they were technically G.100s.[2]
  2. Longer lifetime in the Middle East.
Citations
  1. Bruce'67, p.3.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Bruce'98, p.36.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 Lamberton, pp.214-215.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 Bruce'67, p.12.
  5. Kelly, p.230.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 Munson, p.41.
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5 Bruce'69, p.308.
  8. 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 Bruce'98, p.37.
  9. Bruce'67, pp.8-10.
  10. Bruce'69, p.303.
Bibliography
  • J.M. Bruce. British Aeroplanes 1914-18. Great Britain, Funk & Wagnalls, 1957, 1969. ISBN 0370000382
  • J.M. Bruce, Profile Publications 200: The Martinsyde Elephant. Great Britain: Profile Publications, Ltd., 1967.
  • J.M. Bruce, Windsock Datafile 70: Martinsyde Elephant. Great Britain: Albatros Publications, Ltd., 1998. ISBN 1-902207-03-3
  • Kevin Kelly, "Belts and Drums: A Survey of First World War Aircraft Ammunition Totals". Over the Front, Vol. 5, No. 3, Autumn 1990. Walsworth Publishing Co, Inc. and The League of World War I Aviation Historians.
  • W.M. Lamberton and E.F. Cheesman, Fighter Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War. Great Britain: Harleyford Publications Limited, 1960.
  • Kenneth Munson, Fighters 1914-19, Attack and Training Aircraft. New York: MacMillan Publishing Co., Inc., 1976. ISBN 0713707607