Macchi L.1

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Macchi L.1
Role Flying Boat
Manufacturer Macchi
First flight autumn 1915[1]
Introduction autumn 1915 [2]
Primary user ItalianRoundelGreen.png Italy
Number built 139 [2][3] - 140[4][5]
Developed from Lohner T.I
Variants Macchi L.2
Wingspan 16.2 m (53 ft 2 in)[5]-16.4 m (53 ft 10 in)[6][7]
Engine 150hp Isotta-Fraschini
Armament 1-2× forward-firing Revelli
4×25 kg (55 lb) bombs[6]
Max Speed 105 km/h (65 mph)[5] - 109 km/h (68 mph)[6][7]
Climb 1,000 m (3,280 ft) in 13:00[5]
2,000 m (6,560 ft) in 30:00[5]
Ceiling 4,500 m (14,700 ft) [7]
Range 630 km (390 mi)[5]
Endurance 4:00 [7]

When a copy of the capable Lohner Type L or T.I flying boat was captured in May 1915, it was found to be superior to contemporary Italian naval aircraft. Taken to the Macchi-Nieuport factory with a request to manufacture Italian copies, the L40 was extensively studied, and the new plane, the Macchi L.1 was completed by the next month. Thirty-one were built in 1915 and 109 in 1916.[5] The L.1 differed from the Lohner of course in engine and armament, and it served from late 1915 to autumn 1916 when replaced with F.B.A. flying boats or Macchi M.3's, and the remainders were moved to training roles. [2]

The L.1 served widely in reconnaissance, bombing, and patrol roles in both the Adriatic and Mediterranean.[3] The seaplane tender RN Europa operated 4-8 L.1 flying boats.[8]

For more information, see Wikipedia:Lohner L.

Timeline

Miniatures and Models

1:144 Scale

1:285/6mm/1:288 Scale

Resources

Orthographic Drawings

References

Citations
  1. Alegi'03, p.10.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Munson, p.165.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Nowarra, p.159.
  4. Angelucci, p.96.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6 Alegi'03, p.40.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 Nowarra, pp.206-207.
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 Angelucci, p.88.
  8. Alegi'03, p.14.
Bibliography
  • Gregory Alegi, Windsock Datafile 99: Lohner TI/Macchi L1. Great Britain: Albatros Publications, Ltd., 2003. ISBN 1-902207-54-8
  • Enzo Angelucci, ed. The Rand McNally Encyclopedia of Military Aircraft, 1914-1980. New York: The Military Press, 1983 edition. ISBN 0-517-41021-4.
  • Kenneth Munson, Fighters 1914-19, Attack and Training Aircraft. New York: MacMillan Publishing Co., Inc., 1976. ISBN 0713707607
  • Heinz J. Nowarra, Bruce Robertson, and Peter G. Cooksley. Marine Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War. Letchworth, Herts, England: Harleyford Publications Limited, 1966. ISBN 0900435070