Farman H.F.27

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Farman H.F.27
Role Reconnaissance
Manufacturer Farman
Designer Henri Farman
First flight Feb 1915 [1]
Introduction July 1915
Primary users Imperial Russian Aviation Roundel.svg Russia
RAF Type A Roundel.svg U.K. (RFC/RAF)
Roundel of Greece.svg Greece
Number built RNAS: 80; Russia 50 [2]
Developed from Farman H.F.20
Wingspan 16.2 m (53 ft) [3]
Engine 140hp Gnome rotary or
Canton-Unné R9
Armament front flexible MG
250 kg (560 lb) of bombs[3]
Crew 3
Max Speed 147 km/h (91 mph)[4][note 1]
Climb 2,000 m (6,560 ft) in 12:00[4]-14:00[3]
3,000 m (10,000 ft) in 25:00[3]
4,000 m (13,100 ft) in 30:00[4][note 2]
Ceiling 4,800 m (15,700 ft)[4]
Range 520 km (320 mi)[5][note 3]
Endurance 2:40 [4] [note 4]

The Farman H.F.20 had proved to be fragile and underpowered, so the Farman H.F.27 increased engine power, wingspan, and replaced the boom structure with all-metal fittings. Aviation Militaire declined to buy any, but fifty were built in Russia, the RFC equipped two squadrons, thirty-four were used by the RNAS. They had a long lifetime, a testament to their improved durability, and Zeppelin LZ-38 was destroyed in its shed by RNAS HF.27s. Greece purchased four for use in the Aegean. [1]

Russia's fifty HF.27s were built by Dux in 1916, and they were used widely for reconnaissance.[6]

For more information, see Wikipedia:Farman HF.20.

References[edit]

Notes
  1. 132 km/h (82 mph) for Salmson engine.[5]
  2. Salmson engine: 1,000 m (3,280 ft) in 7:30, 2,000 m (6,560 ft) in 20, 3,000 m (9,840 ft) in 34.[5]
  3. Salmson engine.
  4. Four hour endurance with Salmson engine.[5][3]
Citations
  1. 1.0 1.1 Davilla, p.215.
  2. Lamberton, p.84.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 Lamberton, p.218-220.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 Davilla, p.217.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 Durkota, p.357.
  6. Durkota, p.350.
Bibliography
  • Dr. James J. Davilla and Arthur M. Soltan. French Aircraft of the First World War. Flying Machines Press, 1997. ISBN 0-9637110-4-0.
  • Alan Durkota, Thomas Darcey, and Victor Kulikov. The Imperial Russian Air Service. Flying Machines Press, 1995. ISBN 0-9637110-2-4
  • W.M. Lamberton and E.F. Cheesman, Reconnaissance & Bomber Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War. Great Britain: Harleyford Publications Ltd., 1962.