Gotha W.D.14

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Gotha W.D.14
Gotha WD.14.jpg
Role Torpedo Bomber/Seaplane
Manufacturer Gotha
Designer Rösner and Klaube [1]
First flight Jan 1917 [2]
Introduction Feb 1917 [1]
Primary user Cross-Pattee-alternate3.svg Germany
Number built 52 [1]
Developed from Gotha W.D.11
Wingspan 25.0 m (82 ft) [3]
Engine 2×220hp Benz Bz.IV
Armament rear flexible MG
730 kg (1,600 lb)[3] torpedo[note 1]
Crew 1-2
Max Speed 126 km/h (78 mph)[3]-130 km/h (81 mph) [4]
Climb 1,000 m (3,280 ft) in 13:06[4]
1,500 m (4,920 ft) in 23:00[4]
Ceiling 3,000 m (9,840 ft) [3]
Endurance 8:00 [4]

The Gotha WD.14 was a three-seater derived from the Gotha W.D.11. While the W.D.11 was well-built, it was underpowered to carry such a heavy load, so the W.D.14 switched to twin 220hp Benz engines. They were delivered between July 1917 and February 1918 as reconnaissance planes, and torpedo-carrying production resumed in 1918 and continued through the end of the war. Most W.D.14s were were used from flying stations on the North Sea such as Zeebrügge. [2]

Sixty-nine WD.14s were ordered, but only 52 were delivered. Torpedo bombing was found to be too difficult and dangerous to be productive, and the later planes in this series were converted to long-range naval reconnaissance planes.[1][4]

For more information, see Wikipedia:Gotha WD.14.

Timeline[edit]

References[edit]

Notes
  1. To save weight, no front machine gun was carried.[2]
Citations
  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Herris, p.71.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Nowarra, p.48.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 Nowarra, pp.204-205.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 Gray, p.135.
Bibliography
  • Peter Gray and Owen Thetford. German Aircraft of the First World War. Great Britain, Putnam, 1962, 1987. ISBN 0-85177-809-7.
  • Jack Herris, Gotha Aircraft of WWI. USA, Aeronaut Books, 2013. ISBN 978-1-935881-14-8
  • Heinz J. Nowarra, Bruce Robertson, and Peter G. Cooksley. Marine Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War. Letchworth, Herts, England: Harleyford Publications Limited, 1966. ISBN 0900435070