Gotha G.V

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Gotha G.V
GothaG5.jpg
Role Bomber
Manufacturer Gotha
First flight July 1917
Introduction August 1917 [1][2]
Primary user Cross-Pattee-alternate3.svg Germany
Number built 100 [1]
Developed from Gotha G.IV
Variants G.Va, G.Vb
Wingspan 23.7 m (77 ft 10 in) [3][4][5][2]
Engine 2× 260hp Mercedes D.IVa inlines
Armament forward flexible Parabellum
rear flexible Parabellum[note 1]
590 kg (1,300 lb)[3] or 300 kg (660 lb)-500 kg (1,100 lb)[4] of bombs[6]
Crew 3 [5]
Max Speed 140 km/h (87 mph)[7][8][3][4][5][2]
Climb 1,000 m (3,280 ft) in 2:30[2]
2,000 m (6,560 ft) in 8:30
3,000 m (9,840 ft) in 17:00[2]-28:00[7][3][note 2]
12,000 ft (3,700 m) in 29:00[2]-35:00[3]
Ceiling 20,500 ft (6,200 m)[3]-6,500 m (21,300 ft)[7][8][4][5]
Range 840 km (520 mi)[8][3][4][2]

The Gotha G.V was a basic refinement of the design established by the Gotha G.III and G.IV, using the same engines. Fuel tanks were moved to the fuselage instead of the engine nacelles, reducing the chance of fire damage.[1] This did, however, block off any chance for crew interchange between the pilot and rear gunner.[6]

It was found to be robust and difficult to bring down, with more lost to landing accidents than to enemy action.[9]

The type was tested in July 1917 and production deliveries to the front commenced in August. The G.V was found to have slightly better speed than the G.IV but it had a lower rate of climb, in part due to the lower quality of lumber and fuel that was starting to rear its head in 1917. This performance limitation led to the Gotha G.V seeing use mainly as a night bomber, with missions being flown at fairly low altitude of 1,200–2,500 m (3,940–8,200 ft).[10]

For more information, see Wikipedia:Gotha G.V.

Timeline [note 3]

Game Data

Wings of Glory

Official Stats
Availability Maneuver Damage Dmg Points Max Alt. Climb Points
Jul/Aug17-end XD B/B 27 13 or 14 5 142
Card Links

Blue Max/Canvas Eagles

Aircraft Chart

Miniatures and Models

1:144 Scale

1:200 Scale

1:285/6mm/1:288 Scale

1:300 Scale

1:350 Scale

References

Notes
  1. This gun could fire downwards through a tunnel in the fuselage.
  2. The wide disparity in climb rates may reflect that one set was taken unladen and the other with a full bomb load.
  3. German numbers are from bi-monthly Frontbestand records (Effective Frontline Strength).[11]
Citations
  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Herris'13, p.135.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 Herris'14, pp.125-141.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 Lamberton, pp.222-223.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 Angelucci, p.70.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 Grosz'66, p.16.
  6. 6.0 6.1 Gray, p.128.
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 Gray, p.132.
  8. 8.0 8.1 8.2 Munson, p.26.
  9. Angelucci, p.78.
  10. Grosz'66, p.13.
  11. Grosz'85, p.60 and Grosz'86, p.66.
Bibliography
  • Enzo Angelucci, ed. The Rand McNally Encyclopedia of Military Aircraft, 1914-1980. New York: The Military Press, 1983 edition. ISBN 0-517-41021-4.
  • Peter Gray and Owen Thetford. German Aircraft of the First World War. Great Britain, Putnam, 1962, 1987. ISBN 0-85177-809-7.
  • Peter M. Grosz, Profile Publications 115: The Gotha GI-GV. Great Britain: Profile Publications, Ltd., 1966.
  • Jack Herris, Gotha Aircraft of WWI. USA, Aeronaut Books, 2013. ISBN 978-1-935881-14-8
  • Jack Herris, German G-Type Bombers of WWI. Aeronaut Books, 2014. ISBN 978-1-935881-26-1.
  • W.M. Lamberton and E.F. Cheesman, Reconnaissance & Bomber Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War. Great Britain: Harleyford Publications Ltd., 1962. ISBN 9780900435027
  • Kenneth Munson, Bombers: Patrol and Reconnaissance Aircraft, 1914-1919. New York: The MacMillan Company, 1968, Blandford Press Ltd. ISBN 978-0753721711