Farman H.F.30

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Farman H.F.30
Role Reconnaissance
Manufacturer Farman
Designer Henri Farman
First flight Dec 1915 [1]
Primary user Imperial Russian Aviation Roundel.svg Russia
Number built ~400 [1]
Developed from Farman H.F.27
Wingspan 11.0 m (36 ft 2 in) [2]
Engine 150-160hp Canton-Unné radial
Armament front flexible MG
Crew 2
Max Speed 155 km/h (96 mph)[1]-161 km/h (100 mph)[2][note 1]
Climb 2,000 m (6,560 ft) in 9:00[1][note 2]
Ceiling 4,500 m (14,800 ft)[3]
Range 540 km (340 mi)[3]
Endurance 2:00[2] - 4:00 [3]

The Farman H.F.30 was derived from the Farman H.F.27. Some sat the pilot in the front seat and had a more streamlined nacelle, with a machine gun on a tubular beam above the pilot's head. Others put the observer forward in a blunt nosed nacelle with a more conventional machine gun on a rotating bracket. While never adopted by the Aviation Militaire, around four hundred were built in Russia by Dux, making it one of the most numerous and important Russian aircraft. After the war it served in the Russian Civil War and they were not struck from the rolls until the late 1920's.[1]

Russia also built the 30bis, with the 160hp Salmson engine and long twin exhaust pipes to carry fumes above the top wing. [4]

For more information, see Wikipedia:Farman F.30.

Game Data[edit]

Wings of Glory[edit]

Unofficial Stats
Availability Maneuver Damage Dmg Points Max Alt. Climb
Maneuver.png Firing.png Damage.png Ceiling.png Climb.png
15Q4-16Q4 XD B 10 10 6
Card Links[edit]

Miniatures and Models[edit]

1:144 Scale[edit]

References[edit]

Notes
  1. 136 km/h (85 mph) for 150hp Russian Salmson engine.[3]
  2. 1,000 m (3,280 ft) in 5:00, 2,000 m (6,560 ft) in 13:00, 3,000 m (9,840 ft) in 24:00 with 150hp Russian Salmson.[3]
Citations
  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 Davilla, p.217.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Lamberton, p.218-220.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 Durkota, p.357.
  4. Durkota, p.350.
Bibliography
  • Dr. James J. Davilla and Arthur M. Soltan. French Aircraft of the First World War. Flying Machines Press, 1997. ISBN 0-9637110-4-0.
  • Alan Durkota, Thomas Darcey, and Victor Kulikov. The Imperial Russian Air Service. Flying Machines Press, 1995. ISBN 0-9637110-2-4
  • W.M. Lamberton and E.F. Cheesman, Reconnaissance & Bomber Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War. Great Britain: Harleyford Publications Ltd., 1962.