D.F.W. C.V

From Wings of Linen
(Redirected from DFW C.V)
Jump to navigation Jump to search
D.F.W. C.V
DFW C.V (Av) banking.jpg
Role Reconnaissance
Manufacturer D.F.W.
First flight May 1916 [1]
Introduction Sep-Oct 1916 [2]
Primary users Cross-Pattee-alternate3.svg Germany
Roundel otto.JPG Ottoman Empire [3]
Number built 3955 [note 1]
Wingspan 13.3 m (43 ft 7 in) [5]
Engine 220hp Benz Bz.IV inline
Armament sync. fixed LMG08/15 and
rear flexible Parabellum
100 kg (220 lb) of bombs[5]
Crew 2
Max Speed 150 km/h (93 mph)[6] to 155 km/h (96 mph)[7][8] to 161 km/h (100 mph)[5]
Climb 1,000 m (3,280 ft) in 4:00[7][6]-5:45[5]
2,000 m (6,560 ft) in 7:00[6]-13:00[5]
3,000 m (9,840 ft) in 15:00[6]-21:45[5]
Ceiling 5,000 m (16,400 ft)[7] to
6,400 m (21,000 ft)[8][5]
Endurance 3:30 [7] to 4:30[8][5]

The superb D.F.W. C.V was one of the most successful two-seaters of the war, dominating the German air force C-Class counts from spring of 1917 through the armistice. They were built in large numbers not only by D.F.W., but also by Aviatik, L.V.G., and Halberstadt. Over 1000 were at the front in August of 1917.

Early planes featured ear (side) radiators and a fully-cowled engine, but later planes moved the radiator to the top-front of the wing and dispensed with engine cowling. Crews found them to be without serious flaws: easy to fly and land, roomy, and possessing of plenty of power. It was only in the second half of 1918 that they were starting to show their age and were being replaced by the more modern Halberstadt C.V and L.V.G. C.VI.

The DFW C.V was truly the definitive German two-seater of 1917 and early 1918, serving in Italy, Macedonia, Palestine, and of course the Western Front.[3]

For more information, see Wikipedia:DFW C.V.

Timeline [note 2][edit]

Game Data[edit]

Wings of Glory[edit]

Unofficial Stats
Availability Maneuver Damage Dmg Points Max Alt. Climb
Maneuver.png Firing.png Damage.png Ceiling.png Climb.png
16Q3-18Q4 G B/B 16 11 5

Blue Max/Canvas Eagles[edit]

Aircraft Chart

Miniatures and Models[edit]

1:144 Scale[edit]

1:285/6mm/1:288 Scale[edit]

1:350 Scale[edit]

Resources[edit]

Isometric Top Views[edit]

References[edit]

Notes
  1. 3955 were ordered. Most -- if not all -- were probably built.[4]
  2. German numbers are from bi-monthly Frontbestand records (Effective Frontline Strength).[9]
Citations
  1. Grosz'95, p.2.
  2. Grosz'95, p.3.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Lamberton, p.132.
  4. Grosz'95, p.37.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6 5.7 Lamberton, pp.222-223.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 Grosz'95, p.37.
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 Gray, p.81.
  8. 8.0 8.1 8.2 Munson, p.37.
  9. Grosz'85, p.60 and Grosz'86, p.66.
Bibliography
  • Peter Gray and Owen Thetford. German Aircraft of the First World War. Great Britain, Putnam, 1962, 1987. ISBN 0-85177-809-7.
  • Peter M. Grosz, "Archiv -- Frontbestand". WW1 Aero, № 107, Dec 1985 and № 108, Feb 1986. Poughkeepsie, NY: World War I Aeroplanes, Inc.
  • P.M. Grosz, Windsock Datafile 53: DFW C.V. Great Britain: Albatros Publications, Ltd., 1995. ISBN 0-948414-70-7
  • W.M. Lamberton and E.F. Cheesman, Reconnaissance & Bomber Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War. Great Britain: Harleyford Publications Ltd., 1962.
  • Kenneth Munson, Bombers: Patrol and Reconnaissance Aircraft, 1914-1919. New York: The MacMillan Company, 1968, Blandford Press Ltd. ISBN 978-0753721711