Armstrong-Whitworth F.K.3

From Wings of Linen
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Armstrong-Whitworth F.K.3
Armstrong-Whitworth FK3 captured.jpg
Role Reconnaissance
Manufacturer Armstrong-Whitworth
Designer Frederick Koolhoven
Introduction Sep 1916 [1][2]
Primary user RAF Type A Roundel.svg U.K. (RFC/RAF)
Number built ~500 [1][2]
Wingspan 12.2 m (40 ft 1 in) [3]
Engine 90hp RAF 1a vee or
105hp RAF 1b vee
Armament flexible rear Lewis on pillar mount
51 kg (112 lb) of bombs[3]
Crew 2
Max Speed 140 km/h (87 mph) [4]
Climb 610 m (2,000 ft) in 7:00[3]
910 m (3,000 ft) in 10:30[4]
1,500 m (5,000 ft) in 19:00[3]
2,000 m (6,500 ft) in 26:30[4]
3,000 m (10,000 ft) in 48:56[4]
Ceiling 3,700 m (12,000 ft) [4][3]
Endurance 3:00 [4]

When Frederick Koolhoven offered to reduce the complexity of the R.A.F. B.E.2c for easier production, the result was the Armstrong-Whitworth F.K.3. With the prototype, as with the BE.2, the pilot sat in the rear, leaving the observer with less-than-perfect sight lines, but production aircraft fortunately reversed this and moved the pilot to the front seat of the communal cockpit. Dual controls were provided, which made the FK.3 a natural fit as a trainer later in its career, where it served in large numbers until the adoption of the Avro 504 as a standard trainer. Operationally it was only used in the Middle East, where 47th Squadron used the FK.3 from September 1916 until 1918. Its RFC nickname was Little Ack. [1]

For more information, see Wikipedia:Armstrong Whitworth F.K.3.

Timeline[edit]

References[edit]

Citations
  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Bruce, p.12.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Lamberton, p.42.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 Lamberton, pp.214-215.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 Bruce'69, p.14.
Bibliography
  • J.M. Bruce. British Aeroplanes 1914-18. Great Britain, Funk & Wagnalls, 1957, 1969. ISBN 0370000382
  • W.M. Lamberton and E.F. Cheesman, Reconnaissance & Bomber Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War. Great Britain: Harleyford Publications Ltd., 1962.