Albatros C.III

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Albatros C.III
Albatros C.III.jpg
Role Reconnaissance
Manufacturer Albatros
Introduction winter 1915-1916
Primary users Cross-Pattee-alternate3.svg Germany
Roundel otto.JPG Ottoman Empire
Number built 2271[1] [note 1]
Developed from Albatros B.III
Wingspan 11.69 m (38 ft 4 in) [2][3] [note 2]
Engine 150hp Benz Bz.III inline or
160hp Mercedes D.III inline
Armament rear flexible Parabellum and
sync. fixed LMG08/16[note 3]
91 kg (200 lb)[4]-100 kg (220 lb)[3] of bombs
Crew 2
Max Speed 140 km/h (87 mph)[5][6][4][3]
or 135 km/h (84 mph)-150 km/h (93 mph)[2]
Climb 1,000 m (3,280 ft) in 8:00[2]-9:00[5][note 4]
2,000 m (6,560 ft) in 22:00[4][2][note 5]
3,000 m (9,840 ft) in 45:00[2][note 6]
Ceiling 3,400 m (11,200 ft)[5][6][4][3]
Endurance 4:00 [5][6][3]

The Albatros C.III was one of the most important aircraft of the mid-war. Due to its robust plywood fuselage, it could take a lot of punishment. Its reliable engines allowed a pilot's fixed gun to be added with little performance drop, making it one of the first two-seaters with weapons for both crew members.

So popular was the C.III that production was spread between Albatros, B.F.W., D.F.W., H.F.Caspar, Linke-Hofmann, L.V.G., O.A.W., and S.S.W. [7]

It was, in fact, the most common German two-seater at the front from spring of 1916 to the beginning of 1917.[8]

For more information, see Wikipedia:Albatros C.III.

Timeline [note 7]

Game Data

Wings of Glory

Official Stats
Availability Maneuver Damage Dmg Points Max Alt. Climb Points
Nov/Dec15-late17 Y B/B 14 8 8 81
Card Links

Blue Max/Canvas Eagles

Aircraft Chart

Miniatures and Models

1:144 Scale

1:285/6mm/1:288 Scale

Resources

Orthographic Drawings

References

Notes
  1. Less than 800 were used operationally; the rest were used as trainers.[1]
  2. Some models appear to have been built with 11 m (36 ft 1 in) wings.[2]
  3. On many planes. Some were not fitted with the fixed gun.
  4. 5:00 best recorded time to 1,000 m (3,280 ft).[2]
  5. 12:30 best recorded time to 2,000 m (6,560 ft).[2]
  6. 25:00 best recorded time to 3,000 m (9,840 ft).[2]
  7. German numbers are from bi-monthly Frontbestand records (Effective Frontline Strength).[8]
  8. 8.0 8.1 Updated card
Citations
  1. 1.0 1.1 Grosz'89, p.28.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 2.8 Grosz'89, p.29.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 Angelucci, p.84.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 Lamberton, pp.220-221.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 Gray, p.26.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 Munson, p.35.
  7. Lamberton, p.118.
  8. 8.0 8.1 Grosz'85, p.60 and Grosz'86, p.66.
Bibliography
  • Enzo Angelucci, ed. The Rand McNally Encyclopedia of Military Aircraft, 1914-1980. New York: The Military Press, 1983 edition. ISBN 0-517-41021-4.
  • Peter Gray and Owen Thetford. German Aircraft of the First World War. Great Britain, Putnam, 1962, 1987. ISBN 0-85177-809-7.
  • Peter M. Grosz, "Archiv -- Frontbestand". WW1 Aero, № 107, Dec 1985 and № 108, Feb 1986. Poughkeepsie, NY: World War I Aeroplanes, Inc.
  • P.M. Grosz, Windsock Datafile 13: Albatros C.III. Great Britain: Albatros Publications, Ltd., 1989. ISBN 0-948414-17-0
  • W.M. Lamberton and E.F. Cheesman, Reconnaissance & Bomber Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War. Great Britain: Harleyford Publications Ltd., 1962. ISBN 9780900435027
  • Kenneth Munson, Bombers: Patrol and Reconnaissance Aircraft, 1914-1919. New York: The MacMillan Company, 1968, Blandford Press Ltd. ISBN 978-0753721711