Albatros C.III

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Albatros C.III
Albatros C.III.jpg
Role Reconnaissance
Manufacturer Albatros
Introduction winter 1915-1916
Primary users Cross-Pattee-alternate3.svg Germany
Roundel otto.JPG Ottoman Empire
Number built 2271[1] [note 1]
Developed from Albatros C.I
Wingspan 11.7 m (38 ft 5 in) [2] [note 2]
Engine 150hp Benz Bz.III inline or
160hp Mercedes D.III inline
Armament rear flexible Parabellum and
sync. fixed LMG08/16[note 3]
91 kg (200 lb) of bombs[3]
Crew 2
Max Speed 140 km/h (87 mph)[4][5][3]
or 135 km/h (84 mph)-150 km/h (93 mph)[2]
Climb 1,000 m (3,280 ft) in 8:00[2]-9:00[4][note 4]
2,000 m (6,560 ft) in 22:00[3][2][note 5]
3,000 m (9,840 ft) in 45:00[2][note 6]
Ceiling 3,400 m (11,200 ft)[4][5][3]
Endurance 4:00 [4][5]

The Albatros C.III was one of the most important aircraft of the mid-war. Due to its robust plywood fuselage, it could take a lot of punishment. Its reliable engines allowed a pilot's fixed gun to be added with little performance drop, making it one of the first two-seaters with weapons for both crew members.

So popular was the C.III that production was spread between Albatros, B.F.W., D.F.W., H.F.Caspar, Linke-Hofmann, L.V.G., O.A.W., and S.S.W. [6]

It was, in fact, the most common German two-seater at the front from spring of 1916 to the beginning of 1917.[7]

For more information, see Wikipedia:Albatros C.III.

Timeline [note 7][edit]

Game Data[edit]

Wings of Glory[edit]

Official Stats
Maneuver Damage Dmg Points Max Alt. Climb
Maneuver.png Firing.png Damage.png Ceiling.png Climb.png
Y B/B 14 8 8
Card Links[edit]

Blue Max/Canvas Eagles[edit]

Aircraft Chart

Miniatures and Models[edit]

1:144 Scale[edit]

1:285/6mm/1:288 Scale[edit]

Resources[edit]

Orthographic Drawings[edit]

References[edit]

Notes
  1. Less than 800 were used operationally; the rest were used as trainers.[1]
  2. Some models appear to have been built with 11 m (36 ft 1 in) wings.[2]
  3. On many planes. Some were not fitted with the fixed gun.
  4. 5:00 best recorded time to 1,000 m (3,280 ft).[2]
  5. 12:30 best recorded time to 2,000 m (6,560 ft).[2]
  6. 25:00 best recorded time to 3,000 m (9,840 ft).[2]
  7. German numbers are from bi-monthly Frontbestand records (Effective Frontline Strength).[7]
  8. 8.0 8.1 Updated card
Citations
  1. 1.0 1.1 Grosz'89, p.28.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 2.8 Grosz'89, p.29.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 Lamberton, pp.220-221.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 Gray, p.26.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 Munson, p.35.
  6. Lamberton, p.118.
  7. 7.0 7.1 Grosz'85, p.60 and Grosz'86, p.66.
Bibliography
  • Peter Gray and Owen Thetford. German Aircraft of the First World War. Great Britain, Putnam, 1962, 1987. ISBN 0-85177-809-7.
  • Peter M. Grosz, "Archiv -- Frontbestand". WW1 Aero, № 107, Dec 1985 and № 108, Feb 1986. Poughkeepsie, NY: World War I Aeroplanes, Inc.
  • P.M. Grosz, Windsock Datafile 13: Albatros C.III. Great Britain: Albatros Publications, Ltd., 1989. ISBN 0-948414-17-0
  • W.M. Lamberton and E.F. Cheesman, Reconnaissance & Bomber Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War. Great Britain: Harleyford Publications Ltd., 1962.
  • Kenneth Munson, Bombers: Patrol and Reconnaissance Aircraft, 1914-1919. New York: The MacMillan Company, 1968, Blandford Press Ltd. ISBN 978-0753721711