Wight Converted Seaplane

From Wings of Linen
Revision as of 01:21, 17 March 2019 by ReducedAircraftFactory (talk | contribs) (Details from Nowarra)
(diff) ← Older revision | Latest revision (diff) | Newer revision → (diff)
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Wight Converted Seaplane
Wight Converted Seaplane samf4u.jpg
Role Seaplane
Manufacturer Wight
Primary user RAF Type A Roundel.svg U.K. (RNAS)
Number built 37[1] - 45[2]
Wingspan 19.8 m (65 ft)[3]
Engine 275hp Rolls-Royce or
265hp Sunbeam Maori
Armament rear flexible Lewis
190 kg (424 lb)[note 1] of bombs
Crew 2
Max Speed 135 km/h (84 mph) [1][3]
Climb 610 m (2,000 ft) in 4:20[1]
910 m (3,000 ft) in 6:45[3]
2,000 m (6,500 ft) in 18:20[1]
3,000 m (10,000 ft) in 42:30[1][3]
Service Ceiling 2,900 m (9,600 ft) [1]-3,600 m (11,900 ft)[3]
Endurance 3:30 [1]

Wight had tried to build a bomber but the project was unsuccessful, but they took the same designed and adapted it as a seaplane. It was known as the Wight "Converted" Seaplane. As with all Wight seaplanes, the main floats were long enough to eliminate the need for a rear float. The long upper wings were supported by king posts and the engine was the excellent 275hp Rolls-Royce.

The plane was widely used for coastal patrol and one sunk U-Boat U.B.32 in August 1917. Thirty-seven were built and were used alongside the more common Short Type 184 through the Armistice. [1]

The type was used widely in anti-submarine operations, but by the end of the war, only five were still serviceable.[2]

For more information, see Wikipedia:Wight Converted Seaplane.

References[edit]

Notes
  1. 2×45 kg (100 lb) and 2×51 kg (112 lb) bombs.[2]
Citations
  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 Bruce'69, p.721.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Nowarra, p.114.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 Nowarra, pp.202-203.
Bibliography
  • J.M. Bruce. British Aeroplanes 1914-18. Great Britain, Funk & Wagnalls, 1957, 1969. ISBN 0370000382
  • Heinz J. Nowarra, Bruce Robertson, and Peter G. Cooksley. Marine Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War. Letchworth, Herts, England: Harleyford Publications Limited, 1966. ISBN 0900435070