Hanriot H.D.1

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Hanriot H.D.1
Swiss Air Force Hanriot HD.1.jpg
Role Fighter
Manufacturer Hanriot
Designer Pierre Dupont
First flight June 1916 [1]
Introduction Aug 1917 [1]
Primary users ItalianRoundelGreen.png Italy
Roundel of Belgium.svg Belgium
Number built 1562 [2] or ~1000 [1]
Variants Hanriot H.D.2
Wingspan 8.69 m (28 ft 6 in) [3]
Engine 110hp Le Rhône 9Jb rotary
Armament sync. fixed Vickers
Crew 1
Max Speed see table
Climb 1,000 m (3,280 ft) in 2:40[4]/2:58[5]
2,000 m (6,560 ft) in 6:40[4]/6:03[5]
3,000 m (9,840 ft) in 11:00[4][5]
Ceiling 5,900 m (19,400 ft)[4] to 6,000 m (19,700 ft)[6][5]
Endurance 2:30 [4][6][5]

The nimble Hanriot H.D.1 was never accepted by France's Aviation Militaire, probably because it used the same engine as the Nieuport 16 and 17, which was already in production. It found great proponents, though, in Italy and Belgium and (after the war) Switzerland.

Seventy-nine HD.1s were ordered by Belgium and the supplied First Escadrille starting in August 1917, and as they arrived HD.1s were used by most Belgian fighter escadrilles. Ninth and Eleventh used HD.1s through the end of the war.

In Italy, the HD.1 was found to be superior to the Nieuport 17 and Italian pilots were impressed with this strength and agility. Production began in the winter of 1916-1917. Italian HD.1s moved the machine gun from its original port-offset position to central. 76ª Squadriglia rececived their first on August 1717 and the by November they were in use by eight squadriglia. By the Armistice it was still in service with about eighteen squadriglia, sometimes mixed with other types. Seventeen hundred Italian HD.1s were ordered and 831 were delivered before the Armistice.

EngineSpeedClimbCeiling
110hp Le Rhône 9Jb rotary 182 km/h (113 mph)[3][4][5][6] 2,000 m (6,500 ft) in 5:10[3]
3,000 m (10,000 ft) in 8:30[3]
4,000 m (13,120 ft) in 13:10[3]
6,400 m (21,000 ft)[3]
130hp Le Rhône rotary 187 km/h (116 mph)[3] 2,000 m (6,500 ft) in 5:31[3]
3,000 m (10,000 ft) in 9:17[3]
4,000 m (13,120 ft) in 14:08[3]
7,200 m (23,600 ft)[3]

For more information, see Wikipedia:Hanriot HD.1.

Timeline [note 1]

Game Data

Wings of Glory

Official Stats
Availability Maneuver Damage Dmg Points Max Alt. Climb
Maneuver.png Firing.png Damage.png Ceiling.png Climb.png
16Q3-16Q4 F B 14 14 3

Plane and Crew Cards

Card Links

Blue Max/Canvas Eagles

Aircraft Chart

Miniatures and Models

1:144 Scale

1:285/6mm/1:288 Scale

1:350 Scale

References

Notes
  1. Numbers are approximate, based on unit counts.[1]
Citations
  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Davilla, p.270.
  2. Alegi, p.36.
  3. 3.00 3.01 3.02 3.03 3.04 3.05 3.06 3.07 3.08 3.09 3.10 Lamberton, pp.216-217.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 Davilla, p.272.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 Bruce, p.25.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 Munson, p.66.
Bibliography
  • J.M. Bruce, Windsock Datafile 12: Hanriot HD.1. Great Britain: Albatros Publications, Ltd., 1988. ISBN 0-948414-14-6
  • Gregory Alegi, Windsock Datafile 92: Hanriot HD.1/HD.2. Great Britain, Albatros Publications, Ltd., 2002. ISBN 1-902207-47-5
  • Dr. James J. Davilla and Arthur M. Soltan. French Aircraft of the First World War. Flying Machines Press, 1997. ISBN 0-9637110-4-0.
  • W.M. Lamberton and E.F. Cheesman, Fighter Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War. Great Britain: Harleyford Publications Limited, 1960.
  • Kenneth Munson, Fighters 1914-19, Attack and Training Aircraft. New York: MacMillan Publishing Co., Inc., 1976. ISBN 0713707607