Farman M.F.7

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Farman M.F.7
Farman MF7 Longhorn.jpg
Role Reconnaissance
Manufacturer Farman
Designer Maurice Farman
First flight 1913
Primary users Roundel of the French Air Force before 1945.svg France
Roundel of Belgium.svg Belgium
ItalianRoundelGreen.png Italy
Imperial Russian Aviation Roundel.svg Russia
RAF Type A Roundel.svg U.K. (RFC/RAF)
Roundel of Greece.svg Greece
Number built 350 in France[1]
Wingspan 15.5 m (50 ft 9 in)[1]-15.5 m (51 ft) [2][3]
Engine 70hp Renault 8B inline
or 70-130hp Renault
or 100hp Lorraine
or 75hp Rolls-Royce Hawk [4]
Armament Occasionally 1 forward flexible MG
Crew 2
Max Speed 90 km/h (56 mph)[2] - 95 km/h (59 mph)[5][3][1]
Climb 3,000 ft (910 m) in 18:00[2]
Ceiling 4,000 m (13,100 ft)[6][3][1]
Endurance 3:15 [6][1] - 3:30[3]

The gentle Maurice Farman M.F.7 "Longhorn", aka the "Type 1913", was used in a variety of roles in 1914-1915, and -- due to its forgiving characteristics -- it served even longer as a trainer. It served in at least eleven escadrilles with Aviation Militaire and it was also used operationally by Belgium, Greece, Italy, Japan, Russia and Spain. As early as 1915, MF7s were used for bombing, balloon attack, and as a fighter/escort for other MF7s.[7] When the war started, five of the 23 French escadrilles were M.F.7 units.[8]

Dux built the MF.7 for Russia with a modified nacelle nose and crew seats and an 80hp Gnome rotary.[9]

For more information, see Wikipedia:Farman MF.7.

Timeline [note 1] [note 2]

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Game Data

Wings of Glory

Official Stats
Version Availability Maneuver Damage Dmg Points Max Alt. Climb
unarmed 14Q4-15Q4 XA - 9 10 7
armed XA B/- 9 10 7

Plane and Crew Cards

Miniatures and Models

1:144 Scale

1:285/6mm/1:288 Scale

Resources

Isometric Top Views

References

Notes
  1. Plane counts are approximate and based of escadrille usage in Davilla'97.
  2. British usage numbers are approximate, derived from the squadron histories.[10]
Citations
  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 Ferry'14, p.57.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Lamberton, pp.218-219.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 Angelucci, p.20.
  4. Lamberton, p.86.
  5. Davilla, p.222.
  6. 6.0 6.1 Davilla, p.217.
  7. Davilla, p.219.
  8. Ferry'14, p.5.
  9. Durkota, p.346.
  10. Philpott'13, pp.379-444.
Bibliography
  • Enzo Angelucci, ed. The Rand McNally Encyclopedia of Military Aircraft, 1914-1980. New York: The Military Press, 1983 edition. ISBN 0-517-41021-4.
  • Dr. James J. Davilla and Arthur M. Soltan. French Aircraft of the First World War. Flying Machines Press, 1997. ISBN 0-9637110-4-0.
  • Alan Durkota, Thomas Darcey, and Victor Kulikov. The Imperial Russian Air Service. Flying Machines Press, 1995. ISBN 0-9637110-2-4
  • Ferry, Vital. French Aviation During the First World War. Paris: Histoire and Collections, 2014. ISBN 978-2-35250-370-5
  • W.M. Lamberton and E.F. Cheesman, Reconnaissance & Bomber Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War. Great Britain: Harleyford Publications Ltd., 1962. ISBN 9780900435027
  • Ian Philpott, The Birth of the Royal Air Force. Great Britain: Pen & Sword Books Limited, 2013. ISBN 978-1-78159-333-2